Sisters

Sisters

The Lives of America's Suffragists

Book - 2005
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Baker & Taylor
Presents an overview of the period between the 1840s and the 1920s that saw numerous victories for women's rights, focusing on Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Alice Paul as the activists who made these changes possible.

McMillan Palgrave
They forever changed America: Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Willard, Alice Paul. At their revolution's start in the 1840s, a woman's right to speak in public was questioned. By its conclusion in 1920, the victory in woman's suffrage had also encompassed the most fundamental rights of citizenship: the right to control wages, hold property, to contract, to sue, to testify in court. Their struggle was confrontational (women were the first to picket the White House for a political cause) and violent (women were arrested, jailed, and force-fed in prisons). And like every revolutionary before them, their struggle was personal.

For the first time, the eminent historian Jean H. Baker tellingly interweaves these women's private lives with their public achievements, presenting these revolutionary women in three dimensions, humanized, and marvelously approachable.


Holtzbrinck
They forever changed America: Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Willard, Alice Paul. At their revolution's start in the 1840s, a woman's right to speak in public was questioned. By its conclusion in 1920, the victory in woman's suffrage had also encompassed the most fundamental rights of citizenship: the right to control wages, hold property, to contract, to sue, to testify in court. Their struggle was confrontational (women were the first to picket the White House for a political cause) and violent (women were arrested, jailed, and force-fed in prisons). And like every revolutionary before them, their struggle was personal.

Books have extolled their accomplishments and noted their sacrifices. For the first time, the eminent historian Jean H. Baker tellingly interweaves these women's private lives with their public achievements. As only a biographer can, Baker presents these revolutionary women in three dimensions, humanized, and marvelously approachable. Stone the martyr and missionary; Stanton the antireligious individualist; Anthony the activist lesbian; Willard the organizational mastermind; Paul the militant feminist. Finally, these formidable founding mothers of American feminism have been introduced as the sisters they were to each other, and as they must be remembered by the feminists who follow in their footsteps.


Blackwell North Amer
They forever changed America: Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Willard, Alice Paul. At their revolution's start in the 1840s, a woman's right to speak in public was questioned. By its conclusion in 1920, the victory in woman's suffrage had also encompassed the most fundamental rights of citizenship: the right to control wages, to hold property, to form contracts, to sue, to testify in court. Their struggle was confrontational (women were the first to picket the White House for a political cause) and violent (women were arrested, jailed, and force-fed in prisons). And like every revolutionary's before them, their struggle was personal.
Books have extolled their accomplishments and noted their sacrifices. For the first time, historian Jean H. Baker tellingly interweaves these women's private lives with their public achievements. As only a biographer can, Baker presents these revolutionary women in three dimensions, humanized, and approachable: Stone the martyr and missionary; Stanton the antireligious individualist; Anthony the activist lesbian; Willard the organizational mastermind; Paul the militant feminist. Finally, these formidable founding mothers of American feminism have been introduced as the sisters they were to one another, and as they must be remembered by the feminists who follow in their footsteps.

Baker
& Taylor

The author recalls the 120-year period between the 1840s and 1920 that saw remarkable victories for women's rights, focusing on Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Willard, and Alice Paul as the revolutionaries who made these changes possible.

Publisher: New York : Hill and Wang, 2005
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780809095285
0809095289
9780809087037
Branch Call Number: 324.623 B174s
Characteristics: 277 p. : ill. ; 24 cm

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floy
Jul 04, 2011

Although I've read abundantly about the suffragist movement, this book still gave me some new details. The author gives more of a sense of the women's personal histories and experiences than other books I've read. It was fascinating to read how these bold women balanced their personal lives with their activism.
Although some important subjects were given short shrift, this is a good book to read first if one is beginning a study of the suffragist movement.

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