Hidden Harmonies

Hidden Harmonies

The Lives and Times of the Pythagorean Theorem

Book - 2011
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Baker & Taylor
A squared plus b squared equals c squared. It sounds simple, doesn't it? Yet this familiar expression is a gateway into the riotous garden of mathematics, and sends us on a journey of exploration in the company of two inspired guides, who trace the life of the Pythagorean theorem from ancient Babylon to the present, visiting along the way Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, President James Garfield, and the Freemasons--not to mention the elusive Pythagoras himself. Why does this theorem have more than two hundred proofs--or is it four thousand? And it has even more applications than proofs: Ancient Egyptians used it for surveying, and today astronomers call on it to measure the distance between stars. It works not just in two dimensions, but any number you like, up to infinity. And perhaps most intriguing of all, it opened the door to the world of irrational numbers.--From publisher description.

McMillan Palgrave

A squared plus b squared equals c squared. It sounds simple, doesn't it? Yet this familiar expression is a gateway into the riotous garden of mathematics, and sends us on a journey of exploration in the company of two inspired guides, acclaimed authors Robert and Ellen Kaplan. With wit, verve, and clarity, they trace the life of the Pythagorean theorem, from ancient Babylon to the present, visiting along the way Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, President James Garfield, and the Freemasons-not to mention the elusive Pythagoras himself, who almost certainly did not make the statement that bears his name.
How can a theorem have more than one proof? Why does this one have more than two hundred-or is it four thousand? The Pythagorean theorem has even more applications than proofs: Ancient Egyptians used it for surveying property lines, and today astronomers call on it to measure the distance between stars. Its generalizations are stunning-the theorem works even with shapes on the sides that aren't squares, and not just in two dimensions, but any number you like, up to infinity. And perhaps its most intriguing feature of all, this tidy expression opened the door to the world of irrational numbers, an untidy discovery that deeply troubled Pythagoras's disciples.
Like the authors' bestselling The Nothing That Is and Chances Are . . .-hailed as "erudite and witty," "magnificent," and "exhilarating"-Hidden Harmonies makes the excitement of mathematics palpable.



Blackwell Publishing
With their The Nothing That is, the Art of the infinite, and Out of the Labyrinth, Robert and Ellen Kaplan have established themselves among the most engaging and accessible writers on mathematics. Their work has been hailed as "crudite and witty," "magnificent," and "exhilarating." In Hidden Harmonies, they unfold the remarkable tale of the Pythagorean theorem with their customary wit and verve, whisking us from Babylon to Egypt to the present, visiting en route Ptolemy. Deseartes, and Einstein---not to mention the elusive Pythagoras himself, who almost certainly did not make the statement that bears his name.

A squared plus b squared equals c squared. We remember the words from school days: In any right triangle, the sum of the squares of the two shorter sides is equal to the square of the longest one. It sounds simple---but this familiar expression is a gateway into the riotous garden of mathematies, where a single idea can blossom in countless ways.

The theorem's implications are stunning. It works even when the sides aren't squared, but "triangled" or "amoeba'd." It holds true not just in two dimensions, but any number you like, up to infinity. And its proofs come in dizzying profusion. Its provers include Leonardo da Vinei, a president of the United States, and Miss E. A. Coolidge, blind from the age of one. The rich variety of proofs bears witness to human euriosity, persistence, and ingenuity---and to the imprint of personality and culture on mathematies.

Baker
& Taylor

Presents a history of the famous relation "A squared plus B squared equals C squared" that assesses its contributors from da Vinci to the Freemasons while analyzing its numerous proofs and applications.
The Harvard mathematician authors of The Art of the Infinite present a history of the famous relation "A squared plus B squared equals C squared" that assesses its contributors from da Vinci to the Freemasons while analyzing its numerous proofs and applications.

Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Press, c2011
Edition: 1st U.S. ed
ISBN: 9781596915220
1596915226
Branch Call Number: 516.22 K141h
Characteristics: xii, 290 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Kaplan, Ellen 1936-

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j
John_M
Nov 11, 2015

To someone who is interested in mathematics, he will probably enjoy this. Though I found that some of the book seemed to be filler, trying to meet the size requirement of the publisher. Regardless I will give this 4 stars.

a
A440Hz
Mar 26, 2011

i have a new appreciation for geometry and its role in everyday life. this theorem begins the breakdown of 'all is number' and at the same time, confirms that all is indeed number (those pythagoreans weren't around for what we now know).

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