Awakening

Awakening

How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America

Book - 2017
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Harvard University Press
Some of the most divisive contests shaping the quest for marriage equality occurred not on the culture-war front lines but within the ranks of LGBTQ advocates. Nathaniel Frank tells the dramatic story of how an idea that once seemed unfathomable—and for many gays and lesbians undesirable—became a legal and moral right in just half a century.

The right of same-sex couples to marry provoked decades of intense conflict before it was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2015. Yet some of the most divisive contests shaping the quest for marriage equality occurred not on the culture-war front lines but within the ranks of LGBTQ advocates. Nathaniel Frank tells the dramatic story of how an idea that once seemed unfathomable—and for many gays and lesbians undesirable—became a legal and moral right in just half a century.

Awakening begins in the 1950s, when millions of gays and lesbians were afraid to come out, let alone fight for equality. Across the social upheavals of the next two decades, a gay rights movement emerged with the rising awareness of the equal dignity of same-sex love. A cadre of LGBTQ lawyers soon began to focus on legal recognition for same-sex couples, if not yet on marriage itself. It was only after being pushed by a small set of committed lawyers and grassroots activists that established movement groups created a successful strategy to win marriage in the courts.

Marriage equality proponents then had to win over members of their own LGBTQ community who declined to make marriage a priority, while seeking to rein in others who charged ahead heedless of their carefully laid plans. All the while, they had to fight against virulent antigay opponents and capture the American center by spreading the simple message that love is love, ultimately propelling the LGBTQ community—and America—immeasurably closer to justice.



Baker & Taylor
The right of same-sex couples to marry provoked decades of intense conflict before it was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2015. Yet some of the most divisive contests shaping the quest for marriage equality occurred not on the culture-war front linesbut within the ranks of LGBTQ advocates. Nathaniel Frank tells the dramatic story of how an idea that once seemed unfathomable--and for many gays and lesbians undesirable--became a legal and moral right in just half a century. Awakening begins in the 1950s, when millions of gays and lesbians were afraid to come out, let alone fight for equal treatment. Across the social upheavals of the next two decades, a gay rights movement emerged with the rising awareness that same-sex love is equal to love everywhere. As movement leaders and ordinary gay people created new communities, alliances, and ideas, a tight-knit cadre of (mostly) gay and lesbian lawyers began to focus on legal recognition for same-sex couples, eventually creating a long-term strategy to win marriage rights in the courts. But first they had to win over members of their own LGBTQ community who declined to make marriage a priority, while reining in others who charged ahead heedless of their carefully laid plans, and often at odds with them. Allthe while, they had to fight against virulent antigay opponents and capture the American center by spreading the simple message that love is love--ultimately propelling the LGBTQ community, and America, immeasurably closer to justice.--

Book News
Written to be accessible for students and general readers but also detailed for scholars, this work chronicles the history of the same-sex marriage in the gay and lesbian community, in the mainstream, and finally in legislation, from the 1950s to the present. There is special emphasis on how the idea of gay marriage actually found opposition in the gay and lesbian community and how it eventually became accepted. There is also much on legal tactics and the fight against antigay forces. B&w photos are included. Author Nathaniel Frank directs the What We Know Project at Columbia Law School. Belknap Press is an imprint of Harvard University Press. Annotation ©2017 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Discusses the history of the marriage equality movement in the LGBTQ community.

Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2017
ISBN: 9780674737228
0674737229
Branch Call Number: 306.766 F851a
Characteristics: xii, 441 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm

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